Historic VASRDs

(The Differences Between the Old VASRDs and the Current VASRD)

Topics:

August 4, 2014 - Mental Disorders
March 9, 2012 - Primary Amyloidosis
January 19, 2012 - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
December 10, 2008 - The Eyes
October 23, 2008 - Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
October 23, 2009 - The Skin
October 6, 2006 - The Respiratory System and The Cardiovascular System
September 26, 2003 - The Spine
July 1, 2003 - Liver Abscess
June 13, 2003 - Tinnitus
September 23, 2002 - Intervertebral Disc Syndrome
August 30, 2002 - The Skin
August 26, 2002 - The Fingers
March 18, 2002 - The Removal of the Breast

The VASRD is changed every now and then by the VA, often with the prompting of Congress. Each change is meant to make the VASRD more fair and complete. Since it takes a very long time to get anything through the VA's study groups and committees, the VASRD is not changed very often, and when it is, the changes are normally pretty small. There have, however, been some pretty big changes in the past, and the VA is currently in the process of rewriting the entire VASRD, so more changes will be coming soon.

On this page, we discuss all the major changes that were made to the VASRD from 2001 to the present.

Note: Everything discussed on this page only really matters for Military Disability Ratings for DoD Disability since the PEB only assigns ratings at the time of the service member's separation from the military. So, if you were separated in 2006, your conditions would be rated on the VASRD from 2006, not the current VASRD. For VA Disability, the VA should automatically update everyone’s ratings to the current VASRD whenever changes are made since they can update ratings over time. (This does not always happen, though. Sometimes things change and they won’t update your rating unless you request it. If you find that you were rated on an old VASRD and the rating hasn’t been changed to conform to the current VASRD, submit an appeal for reconsideration, and they will update it. Be proactive.)

Because each change to the VASRD happens separately, they all have their own effective dates. It can get really confusing trying to sort everything out, so here is what we are going to do for you. Below is a list of all the changes to the VASRD from the present back to 2001. Each change is listed from newest (most recent) to oldest.

If a condition is not discussed below, then it means that it is exactly the same as the current VASRD, and you can simply Find Your Condition on this site.

Additionally, all the code numbers for each condition below is linked to the current version of that condition. Just click on the codes to go to the current ratings.

Each change brings the old VASRD closer to the current VASRD. When we list a date, we don’t describe the change (since it was most likely changed to what we have now), but what the VASRD was like BEFORE the change.

For example, on January 19, 2012 the VA changed the rating for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Before this date, ALS was rated a minimum of 30%. After this date, it was the same as the current VASRD (100%—see our discussion of ALS). So, if you were separated ON or AFTER January 19, 2012, you’ll get the current rating for ALS. If you were separated BEFORE January 19, 2012, then your ALS is rated a minimum of 30%, which we discuss in detail below. Got it?

Again, we’ll give a date and then discuss the VASRD criteria that existed BEFORE that date. If you fall after that date, find the condition on our site. If you fall before that date, read on to see how it was rated.

IMPORTANT! There are a few conditions that have had their ratings changed more than once during the time period we are covering. Make sure you pay attention to this! For example, the ratings for the Skin change TWICE: once in 2002 and once in 2008. If you were separated before the 2002 date, then rate it under the change for that date. If between the 2002 date and the 2008 date, rate it under the change for the 2008 date. If after the 2008 date, it is rated on the current VASRD for The Skin.

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August 4, 2014 - Mental Disorders

The VASRD Codes and condition names for Mental Disorders were different before August 4, 2014. The ratings, however, for these conditions did NOT change. Before this date, all Mental Disorders were rated the same as they are now on the current Psychological Rating System.

These are all the Mental Disorders that existed before 2014.

Code 9201: Disorganized schizophrenia is a kind of schizophrenia that causes symptoms of disorganized thought, including bad communication abilities, illogical behaviors and thought processes, a disconnection from emotions, and illogical mumbling. Delusions and hallucinations are often not present in this kind of schizophrenia.

Code 9202: Catatonic schizophrenia is a type of schizophrenia where the mind seems to shut down entirely. People with this condition often do not respond to any type of external stimuli, and will often sit for long periods without moving at all. They can also sometimes have constant twitches, involuntary movements, or repetitive movements. Rarely do they speak, but some can repeat words or phrases.

Code 9203: Paranoid schizophrenia is a type of schizophrenia where the patient believes that he is always in danger and that anyone around him is trying to hurt him. This causes extreme emotional fluctuation, violent behaviors, constant fear, and various delusions.

Code 9204: All other schizophrenic conditions are rated under this code.

Code 9205: This code is used to rate any schizophrenia that has improved. If the person’s condition no longer causes any significant symptoms, then it is rated under this code on whatever symptoms or circumstances still exist.

Code 9208: Delusional disorder is a condition where a person has delusions that are not illogical, just not real. Normally these delusions are small and do not interfere with the person’s overall functioning. A person diagnosed with schizophrenia cannot also be diagnosed with this condition.

Code 9210: All other psychotic disorders are rated under this code.

Code 9211: Schizoaffective disorder is a condition that is a combination of a psychotic disorder and a mood disorder. The mood can be an extreme high or an extreme low or both. In addition to the mood, the individual has flawed mental processes that can cause hallucinations, paranoia, and delusions.

Code 9300: Delirium is a condition characterized by severe confusion. This is often a symptom of Alzheimer’s. It can come on suddenly and last for a few hours or days. Some episodes can be worse than others.

Code 9301: Dementia due to infection is a severe loss of mental ability because of an infection. All areas of mental functioning can be affected by dementia. Symptoms can include memory loss, inability to communicate, confusion, disorientation, loss of logical thinking, etc. For an infection to cause dementia, it must be present over a long period of time. The dementia will slowly develop with the progress of the infection. Infections that can cause dementia include HIV, syphilis, brain infections and more.

Code 9304: Dementia due to head injury is a severe loss of mental ability because of an injury to the brain. All areas of mental functioning can be affected by dementia. Symptoms can include memory loss, inability to communicate, confusion, disorientation, loss of logical thinking, etc. In cases of head injuries, the dementia usually comes on suddenly, but it can also get worse or better over time.

Code 9305: Vascular dementia is a severe loss of mental ability caused by the brain not getting enough blood. All areas of mental functioning can be affected by dementia. Symptoms can include memory loss, inability to communicate, confusion, disorientation, loss of logical thinking, etc. For vascular dementia, the lack of blood to the brain must be present over a long period of time, and the dementia will develop slowly.

Code 9310: Any dementia that does not have a known cause is rated under this code. All areas of mental functioning can be affected by dementia. Symptoms can include memory loss, inability to communicate, confusion, disorientation, loss of logical thinking, etc.

Code 9312: Dementia due to Alzheimer’s is a severe loss of mental ability because of the Alzheimer’s disease. All areas of mental functioning can be affected by dementia. Symptoms can include memory loss, inability to communicate, confusion, disorientation, loss of logical thinking, etc. In cases of Alzheimer’s, the dementia will usually grow gradually over time as the disease gets worse.

Code 9326: Dementia due to any other medical condition is a severe loss of mental ability because of another medical condition. Medical conditions that can cause dementia include endocrine system disorders, metabolic disorders, Pick’s disease, brain tumors, and more. Substance abuse, like drugs, alcohol, etc., can also cause dementia. All areas of mental functioning can be affected by dementia. Symptoms can include memory loss, inability to communicate, confusion, disorientation, loss of logical thinking, etc.

Code 9327: Organic mental disorders are any kind of decrease in brain function that is caused by a physical medical condition. Although seemingly the same, it is different than dementia. Dementia is an actual psychological illness, while an organic mental disorder is a decrease in mental function strictly caused by the actual brain being damaged by another physical condition.

Code 9400: Generalized anxiety disorder is severe, uncontrollable worry about day-to-day things. This worry is often irrational.

Code 9403: All phobias are rated under this code. Phobias are irrational, severe fears that are tied to specific things. Phobias can range from fear of things like spiders, strangers, blood, etc., to fear of situations like big crowds, flying, leaving the house without your pants on, etc. Phobias are more than just basic fear or dislike. They are often so severe that they lead to extreme behaviors like violence or panic attacks.

Code 9404: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a condition where anxiety causes repetitive actions that are performed to reduce the fear. For example a person afraid of germs will wash their hands obsessively. Often the repetitive action is associated with numbers: washing their hands 14 (20, 5, whatever) times. These repetitive actions can interfere with the ability to work or perform daily tasks.

Code 9410: All other anxiety disorders are rated under this code.

Code 9411: Post-traumatic stress disorder is an anxiety condition that is caused by experiencing a traumatic event. A traumatic event can be defined as many different things, including car crashes, combat, death, abuse, extreme fear caused by an event, physical trauma, sexual abuse, or any other event that conflicts with an individual’s moral/natural ideals.

There are very explicit rules that must be followed in order to diagnose PTSD for Military Disability. The condition must fulfill all the following requirements in order to qualify for a PTSD rating.

PTSD Requirement Categories

PTSD Requirement

Stressor
(a.k.a. traumatic event)

It must be proven that the individual was exposed to a traumatic event in which there were both:
– Actual or threatened physical injury, death, or emotional/psychological/moral injury.
– The individual experienced intense fear, horror, or helplessness.

Intrusive Recollection
(remembering the event)

The individual must regularly remember or re-live the event in at least one of the following ways:
– Thoughts, memories, and images of the event come to mind unwanted on a regular basis, causing emotional and mental distress.
– Nightmares of the event occur on a regular basis.
– There are occasions when the individual feels or acts like they are re-experiencing or re-living the event. These experiences include hallucinations and intense flashback episodes, and can be accompanied by violent or irrational behavior.
– Emotional and mental distress that occurs whenever the individual is exposed to things that remind him of the event. This could be movies, music, sounds, smells, etc.
– Physical distress and reactions that occur whenever the individual is exposed to things that remind him of the event. These physical reactions could include sweats/chills, sensitivity to sounds, increased heart rate and mental processes, etc.

Avoidance/Numbing

The individual must constantly try to avoid reminders of the event or try to shut themselves off emotionally in at least three of the following ways (these behaviors can be conscious—you know you're doing it—or subconscious—you don’t know you're doing it):
– Try to avoid thoughts, feelings, or conversations about the event or similar events.
– Try to avoid places, activities or people that remind him of the event.
– Feel detached from others – not able to connect emotionally with them.
– Not being able to feel or show various feelings like love, anger, hate, etc.
– Feel like he doesn’t have a future, that he won’t live a long life—no plans for the future.
– Doesn’t feel interested in or want to participate in significant activities, like celebrating birthdays—such activities no longer seem important.
– The individual is unable to remember important parts of the event.

Hyper-arousal

The individual must show signs of hyper-arousal. This is when the senses are fully functioning and adrenaline is released into the body. This often occurs because of worry, a need to feel prepared, feeling unsafe, etc. At least two of the following must be present:
– Trouble falling asleep or staying asleep.
– Difficulty concentrating.
– Hyper-vigilance (being extremely and overly aware of things around you, often watching out for any threats).
– Startling very easily. Being startled or caught off guard can also result in a physical violent response.
– Regularly feeling angry and being irritable. Losing his temper easily.

Duration

The symptoms noted in the last three sections must be present for more than one month.

Functional significance

The symptoms must significantly affect the individual’s social or occupational functioning. It could be that they cause stress within the family, the inability to concentrate properly on work assignments, etc. This is left up to the interpretation of the psychiatrist who is diagnosing the condition or the Rating Authorities who are determing the rating for Military Disability.

 

Code 9412: Panic disorder and/or agoraphobia are rated under this code. Panic disorder is a condition where severe panic attacks occur in stressful or fearful situations. Panic attacks are episodes of severe fear that causes the inability to act rationally. With panic disorder, the panic attacks can occur at any time and can last for a few minutes to many months. Agoraphobia is not the same as panic disorder, but often exists along with panic disorder. It is the fear of public places that can also cause panic attacks.

Code 9413: Other neuroses are rated under this code. A neurosis is an anxiety disorder that does not cause socially unacceptable behavior. This is a bit of a tough code to use since the next code (9410) is used for all other anxiety disorders that are not specifically noted elsewhere. So, which code would you use for an anxiety condition that has not yet been listed? If it does not cause socially unacceptable behavior (like violence or panic attacks), it can be rated under this code. All others are rated under code 9410.

Code 9416: Dissociative amnesia, fugue, and identity disorder (multiple personality disorder) are all rated under this code. Amnesia is the loss of memory, and can be long- or short-term memory. Fugue is basically amnesia that lasts for only a few hours up to a few days. Identity disorder is a condition where a person has at least 2 separate personalities that alternately control the person’s actions.

Code 9417: Depersonalization disorder is a condition where a person feels disconnected from his physical self. For example, he may feel like he is not in control of his body, that he is not a part of his body, that he is separated from his feelings and thoughts, that he cannot connect with his personality, that his reflection in a mirror is not actually him, etc. This condition is often the result of severe emotional and mental trauma.

Code 9421: Somatization disorder is a condition where the person regularly sees many different doctors complaining of pain, sexual problems, stomach problems, or nerve problems. These symptoms do actually exist in the patient, but there are no physical causes. The most common explanation, although not proven, is that the physical symptoms are the brain’s way of dealing with stress.

Code 9422: Pain disorder is a condition where the person feels intense pain in numerous locations in the body without a physical medical cause. The pain is real and can be debilitating.

Code 9423: Undifferentiated somatoform disorder includes all other somatoform disorders.

Code 9424: Conversion disorder is a condition where there are neurological symptoms without any neurological causes. Symptoms can include blindness, fits, numbness, paralysis and other nerve conditions.

Code 9425: Hypochondriasis disorder is a condition where a person (a hypochondriac) obsessively believes that he has a serious medical condition (often the believed medical condition changes regularly), but there is nothing at all wrong with his body.

Code 9431: Cyclothymic disorder (cyclothymia) is a condition where you alternate between very happy, euphoric moods and depression. It is like being bipolar, but the highs and lows are not as severe. There can also be periods of normal moods in between each high and low period.

Code 9432: Bipolar disorder is a condition where you fluctuate between extreme happiness (mania) and extreme depression. There is more to bipolarity than just mood, however. When experiencing mania, the entire body works harder and stronger. The brain speeds up and high energy levels are present. This can cause you to be radically impulsive and make bad decisions and behave inappropriately.

Code 9433: Dysthymic disorder (chronic depression) is a condition where there is depression that lasts a long time (at least 2 years), but is less severe than major depressive disorder.

Code 9434: Major depressive disorder (clinical depression) is a condition characterized by severe depression that causes low self-esteem, low energy levels, no motivation, no interest in social activities, etc.

Code 9435: All other mood disorders are rated under this code.

Code 9440: Chronic adjustment disorder is a condition that is caused by a particularly stressful period or event. Symptoms often include sadness, anxiety, hopelessness, anxiousness, trouble sleeping, etc.

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March 9, 2012 - Primary Amyloidosis

Code 7717: Primary amyloidosis (a.k.a. AL amyloidosis, primary systemic amyloidosis, PSA, or amyloid light-chain amyloidosis) is a condition which causes the body to produce abnormal proteins that can build up and interfere with the functioning of the organs. It's a bit of an odd condition since it's not really a blood condition at all, but the VASRD stuck it in this category since there really wasn't a better option. We don't know what causes amyloidosis, and it can affect any organ or function in the body. There was no rating AT ALL for Amyloidosis before March 9, 2012. It had to be rated analogously (see the Analogous and Equivalent Codes page) with another condition.

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January 19, 2012 - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

Code 8017: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a.k.a. Lou Gherig’s Disease or ALS) is a degenerative disease that gets worse over time and affects the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary (you tell the muscle to move—as opposed to involuntary: the heart beats regardless of the brain) muscle movement. Symptoms include loss of coordination, weakness, difficulty eating (72039901), breathing (6840-6841), nerve paralysis, double vision (6009), and weight loss.

This condition is rated on the same Central Nervous Rating System that we use currently, but the rating given for an ALS condition cannot be less than 30%.

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December 10, 2008 - The Eyes

The majority of the eye rating system before 2008 was the same as the eye system we use today. There are a few important changes, though. The differences between the current VASRD and the one before 2008 are as follows:

The Visual Impairment Rating System

There are 3 different ways to evaluate vision problems: Visual Acuity, Visual Field, and Muscle Dysfunction. After the discussion of the rating system, we've included a list of all the eye conditions.

Rating Visual Acuity

In the examinations, all the normal tests for rating visual acuity are required, but in addition, test results of the anatomy of the eye and any abnormalities should also be included.

Since visual acuity is rated on best corrected vision, glasses or contacts must be worn. Before 2008, however, only glasses could be worn, not contacts, unless the contacts were required for medical reasons.

In the current VASRD, there are a few special circumstances for rating visual acuity. Some of them were different before 2008 as follows:

In a single eye, if there is a big difference between the near and far corrected vision, it is a special case that must be referred to the Director of Compensation and Pension Services for rating.

If there are more than 4 diopters between the worse eye’s and the best eye’s prescription, the worse eye can be rated on uncorrected vision if it would give a higher rating than if it was rated on corrected vision.

The following is the chart of ratings for visual acuity. A few differences from the current one: The codes are listed below the ratings themselves since there were many more codes then than there are now.

“Light Perception Only” means that the eye cannot read the eye test chart 1 foot away from it and the eye is unable to see slight motion at 3 feet.

Better Eye →
Worse Eye ↓

Light Perception Only/
Loss of Eye/
Total Blindness

5/200

10/200

15/200

20/200

20/100

20/70

20/50

20/40

Complete loss of the eye itself/ Total Blindness

100%
Code 6061

100%
Code 6063

90%
Code 6064

80%
Code 6064

70%
Code 6064

60%
Code 6065

60%
Code 6065

50%
Code 6065

40%
Code 6066

Light Perception Only

100%
Code 6062

100%
Code 6067

90%
Code 6068

80%
Code 6068

70%
Code 6068

60%
Code 6069

50%
Code 6069

40%
Code 6069

30%
Code 6070

5/200

 

100%
Code 6071

90%
Code 6072

80% Code 6072

70%
Code 6072

60%
Code 6073

50%
Code 6073

40%
Code 6073

30%
Code 6074

10/200

 

 

90%
Code 6075

80%
Code 6075

70%
Code 6075

60%
Code 6076

50%
Code 6076

40%
Code 6076

30%
Code 6077

15/200

 

 

 

80%
Code 6075

70%
Code 6075

60%
Code 6076

40%
Code 6076

30%
Code 6076

20%
Code 6077

20/200

 

 

 

 

70%
Code 6075

60%
Code 6076

40%
 Code 6076

30%
Code 6076

20%
Code 6077

20/100

 

 

 

 

 

50%
Code 6078

30%
Code 6078

20%
Code 6078

10%
Code 6079

20/70

 

 

 

 

 

30%
Code 6078

20%
Code 6078

10%
Code 6079

20/50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10%
Code 6078

10%
Code 6079

20/40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0%
no code

 

Rating Visual Field

In the examinations, the visual field has to be tested using a standard perimeter and 3 mm white object. The test results should include a chart of the 16 meridians in each eye. This visual field must be performed at least twice, but three times is preferred. A tangent screen or campimeter test could be done in addition, but is not required.

The methods used to calculate the visual field are the same as the current VASRDs, but there are a few differences in the following code:

Code 6080: Impairment of the visual field. There are a number of things that rate under this code.

A 30% rating is given if one half of the visual field is lost in both eyes (“homonymous hemianopsia”).

Military Disability ratings for the old eye conditions

The temporal half of the visual field is the half that is away from the nose. If one eye is affected, it is rated 10%. If both eyes, 30%.

Military Disability ratings for the old eye conditions temporal half

The nasal half is the part of the visual field towards the nose. If it is lost in one eye, it is rated 10%. In both eyes, 20%.

Military Disability ratings for the old eye conditions nasal half

All other visual field contractions are rated as follows: If the field is contracted to 5° or less, it is rated 100% for both eyes and 30% for one eye. If it is contracted to between 6° and 15°, it is rated 70% for both eyes and 20% for one eye. If it is contracted to between 16° and 30°, it is rated 50% for both eyes and 10% for one eye. If it is contracted to between 31° and 45°, it is rated 30% for both eyes and 10% for one eye. If it is contracted to between 46° and 60°, it is rated 20% for both eyes and 10% for one eye.

Rating Muscle Dysfunction

Emphasis is put on the face that muscle dysfunction (also known as “diplopia”) must be directly diagnosed. Just occasional diplopia or correctable diplopia cannot be rated.

There are three codes that are used for rating muscle dysfunction before 2008:

Code 6090: Diplopia is a condition where the eye can look at one object and see two separate images.

Code 6091: Symblepharon is a condition where the outside of the eyeball adheres to the inside of the eyelid.

Code 6092: Diplopia due to limited muscle function. We don’t know why this is a separate code. Almost all diplopia is due to muscle dysfunction. That must be why they deleted this code in 2008.

All are rated according to the current Muscle Dysfunction Rating System. There is a change, however, when combining Muscle Dysfunction with Central Visual Acuity or Visual Field.

Muscle Dysfunction and Central Visual Acuity

Since there are two eyes, there are a few different possible combinations.

– If one eye has muscle dysfunction and the other has visual acuity, then just rate the one on muscle dysfunction and the other on its visual acuity.
– If both eyes have both muscle dysfunction and visual acuity, then rate the worst eye on muscle dysfunction, and the other on visual acuity.
– If one eye has muscle dysfunction and visual acuity, and the other only has visual acuity, rate the first on whichever would give the highest rating, muscle dysfunction or visual acuity.

That’s it. The current system that increases the visual acuity was not used before 2008.

Muscle Dysfunction and Visual Field

The changes for visual acuity are the same for visual field:

Since there are two eyes, there are a few different possible combinations.

– If one eye has muscle dysfunction and the other has visual field, then just rate the one on muscle dysfunction and the other on its visual field.
– If both eyes have both muscle dysfunction and visual field, then rate the worst eye on muscle dysfunction, and the other on visual field.
– If one eye has muscle dysfunction and visual field, and the other only has visual field, rate the first on whichever would give the highest rating, muscle dysfunction or visual field.

That’s it. The current system that increases the visual acuity after converting the visual field was not used before 2008.

Conditions of the Eye

Many of the eye conditions that were rated before 2008 are the same as the current VASRD, but there are still quite a few changes. To avoid confusion, all that were rated before 2008 are listed below. All the following conditions are rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System unless otherwise specified.

For codes 6000 – 6009, if the disease is active, then the minimum rating is 10%.

Code 6000: Uveitis is a condition where the uvea swells and becomes red.
Code 6001: Keratitis is the swelling of the cornea of the eye.
Code 6002: Scleritis is the swelling of the sclera.
Code 6003: Iritis is the swelling of the iris.
Code 6004: Cyclitis is the swelling of the ciliary body, the muscles that help focus the lens.
Code 6005: Choroiditis is the swelling of the choroid, a thin layer of tissue below the sclera.
Code 6006: Retinitis is the swelling of the retina.
Code 6007: Intraocular hemorrhage is bleeding in the eye.
Code 6008: Detachment of the retina is a condition where fluid seeps under the retina and could lead to blindness.
Code 6009: Other eye injuries that are not healed are rated here.

Code 6010: Tuberculosis of the eye. This condition is rated as nonpulmonary tuberculosis.

Code 6011: Any condition or irregularity of the retina that is not covered elsewhere is rated here. It is rated 10% for one or both eyes.

Code 6012: Glaucoma (damage to the optic nerve) that is caused by swelling or by congestion is rated as Iritis, code 6003. If the condition has frequent, long attacks, then it is rated 100% while the attacks last.

Code 6013: Glaucoma (damage to the optic nerve) that is not caused by swelling or congestion is rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System. The minimum rating for this condition is 10%.

Code 6014: Malignant cancer in the eye is rated 100% while it is active. Once it is inactive, it is rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System.

Code 6015: Benign tumors in the eye are rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System. The minimum rating for an active tumor is 10%.

Code 6016: Central nystagmus is the twitching or excessive movement of the eye caused by a nerve condition. It is rated 10%.

Code 6017: Trachomatous conjunctivitis is a condition where a bacterial infection causes the conjunctiva to swell despite treatment. This condition is rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System. If the condition is active, the minimum rating is 30%.

Code 6018: All other chronic conjunctivitis is rated 10% while it is active. If it is not active, it is rated 0%.

Code 6019: Ptosis is a condition where the eyelids droop. It is rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System. If the drooping eyelids completely block the pupil so that no vision is possible, it is given a visual acuity of 5/200. If more than half of the pupil is blocked, it is given a visual acuity of 20/100. If less than half is blocked, it is rated under code 7800, disfigurement.

Code 6020: Ectropion is a condition where weak muscles or tissue cause the lower lid to turn inside out. If both eyes have it, it is rated 20%. One eye is rated 10%.

Code 6021: Entropian occurs when an eyelid folds inward. If both eyes, it is rated 20%. One eye is rated 10%.

Code 6022: Lagophthalmos occurs when the eyelids can’t close completely. Two eyes is rated 20%, and one eye is rated 10%.

Code 6023: Complete loss of the eyebrows is rated 10%.  

Code 6024: Complete loss of the eyelashes is rated 10%.

Code 6025: Any condition that hinders the production of tears is rated 20% if both eyes are affected, and 10% if one eye is affected.

Code 6026: Optic neuropathy occurs when the optic nerve is damaged. All conditions that damage the optic nerve that are not glaucoma are rated under this code. This condition can receive two different ratings: one under the Visual Impairment Rating System, and the other under the condition that causes the neuropathy.

Code 6027: A cataract is a condition where the lens in the eye becomes cloudy. It is rated under this code if it was caused by trauma. It is rated under the Visual Impairment Rating System. If surgery has been performed but no new lens implanted, it can also be rated as aphakia.

Code 6028: If the cataract was not caused by trauma, it is rated under this code. It is rated under the Visual Impairment Rating System. If surgery has been performed without a new lens implanted, it can also be rated as aphakia.

Code 6029: Aphakia is the absence of a lens in the eye.

There are two different ways aphakia can be rated. It can be rated 30% if one or both eyes are aphakic, or it can be rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System, whichever gives the higher rating. Just one or the other, never both.

If using the Visual Impairment Rating System:

If one eye has aphakia and the other has visual acuity, then the eye with the visual acuity can be rated on its uncorrected acuity.

If both eyes have aphakia, both are rated on their corrected visual acuity, BUT neither can be assigned a visual acuity better than 20/70. So if both eyes are 20/50, then both would be moved down to 20/70 for rating. If both are already 20/70 or worse, then one of them is moved down to the next worse acuity. So, if the corrected acuity of the right eye is 20/70, and the other is 20/100, then one of them can move down to the next worse. Choose the one that would give the best rating. In this example, 20/100 could move to 20/200, but the rating for 20/70 and 20/200 is only 40% while the rating for 20/100 and 20/100 is 60%.

Code 6030: Paralysis of accommodation occurs when the oculomotor nerve oculomotor nerve is damaged. It is rated 20%.

Code 6031: Dacryocystitis is the welling of the nasolacrimal sac which produces tears. It is rated as production of the tears.

Code 6032: If part or all of the eyelids are missing, it is rated as disfigurement, code 7800.

Code 6033: The dislocation of the crystalline lens is rated as aphakia.

Code 6034: Pterygium occurs when conjunctiva fibers grow into the cornea. It is rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System.

Code 6035: Keratoconus occurs when the cornea slowly changes shape over time. It is rated on the Visual Impairment Rating System on the corrected vision wearing contact lenses. If the contacts are medically required, the minimum rating is 30% for one or both eyes.

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October 23, 2008 - Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

Before 2008, rating traumatic brain injury (TBI) was a lot more simple than it is now. It was referred to as brain disease due to trauma, and was rated as follows:

Code 8045: Brain disease due to trauma is a condition of the brain that occurs after it receives a traumatic injury, like hitting your head in a car accident, or having shrapnel pierce through your skull into the brain.

If there are any serious symptoms like seizures, paralysis, mental disorders, etc., then each symptom is rated on its own. So, seizures would be rated as epilepsy, paralysis would be rated on the affected nerve, etc. All of these conditions must be distinctly diagnosed in order to be rated. (The ratings for the majority of these conditions are the same in 2008 as they are now, but double check this page before proceeding to the current ratings just to make sure).

If there are only symptoms that are not conditions in and of themselves (like headaches, dizziness, insomnia, etc.), then they are all rated together for one single rating of 10% under code 9304, dementia due to trauma. For a higher rating than 10% under this code, dementia itself would have to be clearly diagnosed.

The final rating for any these conditions will look like this: 8045-8910. The first four-digit code defines head trauma as the cause of the condition, and the second four-digit code tells what symptom is being rated, in this case epilepsy (8910).

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October 23, 2008 – The Skin

The Skin ratings changed twice since 2001, once in 2002 and once in 2008. Many of the skin codes are exactly as they are now, and so will not be discussed here. The differences are as follows:

Code 7801: Scars on the body (not the head, face, or neck) that are either deep or limit the motion of the affected body part. This condition is rated on the amount of skin that is affected by the scar. The areas of the scar do not have to be attached to contribute to this rating, but if they are clearly and significantly separate, then they are rated separately. For example, if there are numerous patches of scars on the torso, then they would all contribute to a single rating since they are pretty much the same. If, however, there were patches of scars on both arms, they would be rated separately since they are clearly different.

If the scars cover 144 in2 or more, it is rated 40%. If they cover 72 in2 or more, it is rated 30%. 12 in2 or more is rated 20%, and 6 in2 or more is rated 10%.

Code 7802: Scars on the body (not the head, face, or neck) that are not deep and do not limit the motion of the affected body part. This condition is rated on the amount of skin that is affected by the scar. The areas of the scar do not have to be attached to contribute to this rating, but if they are clearly and significantly separate, then they are rated separately. For example, if there are numerous patches of scars on the torso, then they would all contribute to a single rating since they are pretty much the same. If, however, there were patches of scars on both arms, they would be rated separately since they are clearly different.

If the scars cover 144 in2 or more, it is rated 10%.

Code 7803: Any scar that is superficial and frequently loses the skin over the scar is rated 10%.

Code 7804: Any scar that is superficial and painful to the touch is rated 10%.

Code 7805: All other scars are rated on the body part that it affects. So, if a scar on the elbow keeps the elbow from bending all the way, then it would be rated on limited motion of the elbow.

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October 6, 2006 - The Respiratory System and The Cardiovascular System

The rating systems for the Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems are exactly the same, but before 2006, there were a few tests that were not required that are now required. These tests include:

For the Cardiovascular System:

MET tests

For the Respiratory System:

Pulmonary Function Tests
DLCO (SB)
Post-bronchodilatro studies

These tests do factor into the ratings before 2006, but there were no rules regarding having to have them done and how exactly to use the test’s results. Basically all Respiratory and Cardiovascular conditions were rated exactly as they are now, but with a little more room for the Rating Authorities to decide how best to use the test results to rate the condition. You can pretty much ignore this, really.

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September 26, 2003 - The Spine

A big change was applied to the VASRD in 2003 updating all the Spine ratings and changing the code numbers to what they are now. Before 2003, all spine conditions were rated as follows:

Code 5285 (changed to code 5235): Vertebral fracture occurs when the bones in the spine break. This can occur anywhere along the spine, and so can cause many different symptoms.

If this condition damages the spinal cord, requires the use of long leg braces, or makes the service member bedridden, it is rated 100%. If the condition does not damage the spinal cord, but requires the use of a neck brace, it is rated 60%.

All other vertebral fracture conditions are rated on limited motion of the spine (codes 5286–5292, below). When choosing the code for limited motion, there are three sections of the spine to consider: cervical, dorsal, and lumbar. If one is definitely disabled, but the others only have minor involvement, then only the one can be rated. If, however, each segment is significantly affected, then each can be rated separately. 

Code 5286 (changed to 5240 and 5241): Complete bony fixation of the spine occurs when the spine fuses together (either on its own or surgically), and cannot move at all.  If the spine is stuck in an unnatural position (like curving drastically or leaning to the side), it is rated 100%. If it is frozen in a normal spine shape, it is rated 60%.

Code 5287: If the cervical spine cannot move at all, it is rated 40% if it is frozen in an unnatural position and 30% if it is frozen in the normal spine position. (This code was deleted completely when the spine rules changed.)

Code 5288: If the dorsal spine cannot move at all, it is rated 30% if it is frozen in an unnatural position and 20% if it is frozen in the normal spine position. (Deleted.)

Code 5289: If the lumbar spine cannot move at all, it is rated 50% if it is frozen in an unnatural position and 40% if it is frozen in the normal spine position. (Deleted.)

Code 5290: If the cervical spine is limited in motion, it is rated 30% if it cannot move much at all. If it can move some, but is still pretty limited (maybe cannot turn the head all the way to either side, etc.), it is rated 20%. If it is limited in motion, but can overall still move the head without much difficulty, it is rated 10%. (Deleted.)

Code 5291: If the dorsal spine is limited in motion, it is rated 10% if it is definitely limits its ability to function. If it is limited, but can overall still function without much difficulty, it is rated 0%. (Deleted.)

Code 5292: If the lumbar spine is limited in motion, it is rated 40% if it can hardly move at all. If it can move some, but is still pretty limited (maybe cannot bend more than 45° forward, etc.), it is rated 20%. If it is limited in motion, but can overall still bend over most of the way without much difficulty, it is rated 10%. (Deleted.)

Code 5293 (changed to code 5243): Intervertebral Disc Syndrome occurs when a disc in the spine is dysfunctional. It can deteriorate, herniate, etc. It is rated one of two ways. The first is on Incapacitating Episodes, which is the same as it is now. It can also be rated as follows:

Since intervertebral disc syndrome can affect any part of the spine, it can cause many different symptoms, like nerve pain, limited motion, etc. Any of these symptoms that is always present and distinct from the other symptoms can be separately rated. All these ratings are then combined using VA Math to get one overall rating for this condition.

This overall rating can be used to rate the condition or the rating for Incapacitating Episodes, whichever is higher.

The following two codes are rated the same:

Code 5294 (changed to 5236): Sacroiliac injury and weakness is any injury or condition of the sacroiliac joint.

Code 5295 (change to 5237): Lumbosacral strain is any pain or injury to the low back and lumbosacral joint.

These codes are both rated as follows:

A 40% rating is given if there is limited motion with severe symptoms like the inability to bend forward very far, the spine leans abnormally off to the side, the affected joint is irregular or narrowed, or the inability for the torso to bend to the sides and there is confirmed arthritis is the affected joint.

A rating of 20% is given if there are muscles spasms when bending very far forward, or if the torso cannot bend to the sides at all when standing.

A 10% rating is given if there is pain with motion.

All other minor symptoms are rated 0%.

That’s all the old spine codes. All other spine conditions are rated analogously (see the Analogous and Equivalent Codes page) with these codes.

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July 1, 2003 - Liver Abscess

On July 1, 2003, the code 7313 for abscess of the liver was removed. Liver abscesses are normally caused by another condition, and so should not be separately rated. Just rate the condition that causes it. Before this date, however, they could be rated as follows:

Code 7313: A liver abscess is a pocket of pus inside the liver. If it causes serious symptoms like extreme pain, or interferes seriously with the liver’s ability to function, it is rated 30%. If the symptoms are moderate (they are definitely there and limit the body’s overall functioning, but not seriously), it is rated 20%.

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June 13, 2003 – Tinnitus

Code 6260: Tinnitus is ringing in the ears that often occurs after exposure to serious aural trauma like explosions. It has always been rated 10%, but before this date, there were less rules about how to rate it.

Now, only one rating for tinnitus can be given whether or not it is in only one or both ears. It is safe to assume that this was standard practice even before 2003, but it now clearly states it. It also states now that tinnitus cannot be rated if it is definitely caused by another condition, like a mental disorder or another physical disorder. Again, this was probably common practice since a single symptom cannot be rated twice, but the VASRD just got more specific on it after June 13, 2003.

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September 23, 2002 - Intervertebral Disc Syndrome

Before this date, intervertebral disc syndrome was rated as follows:

Code 5293 (changed to code 5243): Intervertebral disc syndrome occurs when a disc in the spine is dysfunctional. It can deteriorate, herniate, etc. 

If the condition causes constant, significant symptoms like pain down the arms or legs, muscle spasms, loss of nerve reflexes, etc., it is rated 60%. If the symptoms are severe, but not constant, it is rate 40%. If the symptoms are not severe but still fairly significant, regardless of whether or not they are constant, it is rated 20%. Mild symptoms are rated 10%. If there are no symptoms or if surgery was successful in eliminating the symptoms, it is rated 0%.

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August 30, 2002 - The Skin

Note: The skin ratings change twice. Once 2002 and once again in 2008.

Before 2002, the skin ratings had room for quite a lot of interpretation. When they changed, they became more based on measurable facts instead of just personal opinion. The skin was rated as follows:

Code 7800: Scars of the head, face, or neck. If the scars are extremely serious, causing the head, face, or neck to be repulsive on one side of the face, or if the scars are a bit less repulsive but affect both sides of the face, it is rated 50%. If the scars are severe, and cause an obvious deformity of the eyelids, lips, or ears, it is rated 30%. If the scars are clearly present, but not seriously repulsive, with little or mild deformity, it is rated 10%. All lesser scars are rated 0%.

In addition to these ratings, if the scars are also dramatically discoloured (i.e. dark, white, red, etc.), they increase the above ratings. 50% becomes 80%, 30% becomes 50%, and 10% becomes 30%. 0% is not increased.

Code 7801: Third degree burn scars. Third degree burns affect all three layers of the skin. This condition is rated on the amount of skin that is affected by the burn scar. The areas of the burn scar do not have to be attached to contribute to this rating, but if they are clearly and significantly separate, then they are rated separately. For example, if there are numerous patches of scars on the torso, then they would all contribute to a single rating since they are pretty much the same. If, however, there were patches of scars on both arms, they would be rated separately since they are clearly different.

If the burn scars cover 144 in2 or more, it is rated 40%. If they cover 72 in2 or more, it is rated 30%. 12 in2 or more is rated 20%, and 6 in2 or more is rated 10%.

Code 7802: Second degree burn scars. Second degree burns affect the first two layers of skin. This condition is rated on the amount of skin that is affected by the burn scar. The areas of the burn scar do not have to be attached to contribute to this rating, but if they are clearly and significantly separate, then they are rated separately. For example, if there are numerous patches of scars on the torso, then they would all contribute to a single rating since they are pretty much the same. If, however, there were patches of scars on both arms, they would be rated separately since they are clearly different. If the burn scars cover 144 in2 or more, it is rated 10%.

Code 7803: Superficial scars with regular ulcerations. If the scar often has an open wound with infection, it is rated 10%.

Code 7804: Superficial scars that are tender to the touch are rated 10%.

Code 7805: All other scars are rated on the body part they affect. For example, there is a scar over the elbow that limits the elbow’s ability to bend all the way, it would be rated on limited motion of the elbow.

Code 7806: Eczema or dermatitis is the irritation of the skin—the basic rash. If the rash is extremely severe and repulsive, with the skin constantly peeling or crusting or causing open, infected wounds, it is rated 50%. If the rash is constantly oozing, constantly itchy, causes open wounds (not infected necessarily), or is disfiguring, it is rated 30%. If the rash is on a part of the body that is visible (the head, neck, and hands) or covers a lot of the body, and has any peeling, oozing, or itchiness, it is rated 10%. If the rash is small and not on a visible part of the body, and has any peeling, oozing, or itchiness, it is rated 0%.

Code 7807: American (“New World”) leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection on the skin caused by an American sandfly bite. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7808: Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis (“oriental sore”) is a parasitic infection on the skin caused by the bite of an Asian, African, or European sandfly. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7809: Lupus that affects the skin is a condition where the healthy cells of the skin are attacked by the immune system. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7810: Pinta is a skin infection most often found in Central and South America. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7811: Tuberculosis luposa is lupus caused by tuberculosis. While it is active, it is rated 100%. Once it is not active, it is rated on the current rating schedule for nonpulmonary tuberculosis.

Code 7812: Verruga Peruana is a condition where warts form because of a bacterial infection. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7813: Ringworm (“dermatophytosis”) is a red rash that is shaped like a ring. It is caused by a fungal infection. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7814: Tinae barbae is a fungal infection of the hair. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7815: Pemphigus is a bullous disorder that causes pockets (blisters) of clear fluid to form between layers of skin. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7816: Psoriasis is a condition where the body produces too many skin cells because of an autoimmune disorder. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7817: Dermatitis exfoliative is dermatitis (a rash) that covers the entire body. This condition is rated as eczema, code 7806.

Code 7818: Malignant skin cancer is rated under the skin code that best describes them. So, if it causes disfigurement of the face, it is rated under code 7800, etc.

Code 7819: Other skin growths (non-cancerous) are rated under the skin code that best describes them. So again, if it causes disfigurement of the face, it is rated under code 7800, etc.

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August 26, 2002 - The Fingers

Quite a few changes happened for finger ratings in 2002, although the majority of the ratings are the same. It’s difficult to detail the changes, so instead we’ve just noted the complete rating system for these conditions. These changes are only for frozen joints and joints with limited motion. All amputation and other finger ratings are the same as they are now.

Note: Ratings for hand conditions often have different ratings for the dominant and non-dominant hands. “Dominant” refers to the hand you use to write, i.e. right-handed or left-handed. This means that the non-dominant hand is your other hand. If you happen to be ambidextrous, then whichever hand is affected by the condition is considered the dominant hand.

Double Note: If you have multiple different kinds of problems with the fingers on the same hand, then the hand is only given one rating for all of these problems together. For example, if your right hand has the pinky amputated, the ring finger frozen so that it cannot move, and the middle finger can move but only a little bit, then you’d only get one rating for all of these conditions. Rate the entire hand under the type of condition that best describes the overall hand disability. So, if you have two fingers frozen and one amputated, then rate all three fingers as though they were frozen since that is the majority condition.

Final Note: Rate each hand separately. While all the fingers on one hand only receive one rating all together, each hand can receive its own rating. So, if you have a frozen finger on the right hand and two on the left, then the right hand would get a rating for the one, and the left would get another rating for the two.

A condition will be rated here if one or more finger joints are frozen in place and cannot move at all or if they have limited motion. All ratings for frozen finger joints limited motion are based on “favorable” and “unfavorable” positions. The image below shows the different Finger Joint groups. These groups come into play when defining “favorable” and “unfavorable.”

the old Military Disability ratings for the the joints of the hands

Favorable position:

Frozen Joints: The finger joint(s) are frozen bent so that the fingertip(s) are within 2 inches of the transverse crease. In other words, there is not more than 2” between the palm and tips of the finger(s).

Limited Motion: The finger joints are cannot bend the finger to touch the transverse crease completely, but are able to bend the finger to within 2 inches of the palm. In other words, the fingertip can bend so that there is less than 2 inches between it and the palm.

Unfavorable position:

Frozen Joints: Two different things qualify as unfavorable: (1) The finger joint(s) are frozen with more than 2” between the transverse crease and the tip of the finger. (2) Both Joints 2 and 3 (see the Finger Joints image above) are frozen on a single finger, even if they are frozen in a favorable position.

Limited Motion: The finger joint is not able to bend the finger to less than 2 inches away from the transverse crease. In other words, there is always more than 2 inches between the fingertip and the palm.

Extremely unfavorable position:

Frozen Joints: If only 1 finger is affected: All the finger joints are frozen so that the finger is completely straight, the finger joints are all frozen so that the finger is completely closed (like making a fist, but with just one finger), or the joints are frozen so that the bones of the finger do not align as they should, but twist or angle off to the sides.

If multiple fingers are affected: Both Joints 2 and 3 (see the Finger Joints image above) are frozen on each affected finger (or the majority of affected fingers), AND at least one of these joints on each finger is either frozen completely straight or completely bent.

Limited Motion: None.

One Finger
Two Fingers
Three Fingers
Four Fingers
Five Fingers

 

One Finger

Thumb

Index

Long

Ring

Little

Favorable

Unfavorable

Code

Ratings

Dominant

Non-dominant

x

 

 

 

 

 

x

5224

20%

20%

x

 

 

 

 

x

 

5224

10%

10%

x

 

 

 

 

 

extremely

5152

This old VASRD does not specify the degree of amputation to rate under. See the Single Finger Amputations chart and rate the condition on the closest amputation option.

 

x

 

 

 

both rate the same

5225

10%

10%

 

x

 

 

 

 

extremely

5153

This old VASRD does not specify the degree of amputation to rate under. See the Single Finger Amputations chart and rate the condition on the closest amputation option.

 

 

x

 

 

both rate the same

5226

10%

10%

 

 

x

 

 

 

extremely

5154

This old VASRD does not specify the degree of amputation to rate under. See the Single Finger Amputations chart and rate the condition on the closest amputation option.

 

 

 

x

 

both rate the same

5227

0%

0%

 

 

 

x

 

 

extremely

5155

This old VASRD does not specify the degree of amputation to rate under. See the Single Finger Amputations chart and rate the condition on the closest amputation option.

 

 

 

 

x

both rate the same

5227

0%

0%

 

 

 

 

x

 

extremely

5156

This old VASRD does not specify the degree of amputation to rate under. See the Single Finger Amputations chart and rate the condition on the closest amputation option.

 

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Two Fingers

Thumb

Index

Long

Ring

Little

Favorable

Unfavorable

Code

Ratings

Dominant

Non-dominant

x

x

 

 

 

x

 

5223

30%

20%

x

x

 

 

 

 

x

5219

40%

30%

x

x

 

 

 

 

extremely

5142

50%

40%

x

 

x

 

 

x

 

5223

30%

20%

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

5219

40%

30%

x

 

x

 

 

 

extremely

5143

50%

40%

x

 

 

x

 

x

 

5223

30%

20%

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

5219

40%

30%

x

 

 

x

 

 

extremely

5144

50%

40%

x

 

 

 

x

x

 

5223

30%

20%

x

 

 

 

x

 

x

5219

40%

30%

x

 

 

 

x

 

extremely

5145

50%

40%

 

x

x

 

 

x

 

5223

20%

20%

 

x

x

 

 

 

x

5219

30%

20%

 

x

x

 

 

 

extremely

5146

40%

30%

 

x

 

x

 

x

 

5223

20%

20%

 

x

 

x

 

 

x

5219

30%

20%

 

x

 

x

 

 

extremely

5147

40%

30%

 

x

 

 

x

x

 

5223

20%

20%

 

x

 

 

x

 

x

5219

30%

20%

 

x

 

 

x

 

extremely

5148

40%

30%

 

 

x

x

 

x

 

5223

10%

10%

 

 

x

x

 

 

x

5219

20%

20%

 

 

x

x

 

 

extremely

5149

30%

20%

 

 

x

 

x

x

 

5223

10%

10%

 

 

x

 

x

 

x

5219

20%

20%

 

 

x

 

x

 

extremely

5150

30%

20%

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

5223

10%

10%

 

 

 

x

x

 

x

5219

20%

20%

 

 

 

x

x

 

extremely

5151

30%

20%

 

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Three Fingers

Thumb

Index

Long

Ring

Little

Favorable

Unfavorable

Code

Ratings

Dominant

Non-dominant

x

x

x

 

 

x

 

5222

40%

30%

x

x

x

 

 

 

x

5218

50%

40%

x

x

x

 

 

 

extremely

5132

60%

50%

x

x

 

x

 

x

 

5222

40%

30%

x

x

 

x

 

 

x

5218

50%

40%

x

x

 

x

 

 

extremely

5133

60%

50%

x

x

 

 

x

x

 

5222

40%

30%

x

x

 

 

x

 

x

5218

50%

40%

x

x

 

 

x

 

extremely

5134

60%

50%

x

 

x

x

 

x

 

5222

40%

30%

x

 

x

x

 

 

x

5218

50%

40%

x

 

x

x

 

 

extremely

5135

60%

50%

x

 

x

 

x

x

 

5222

40%

30%

x

 

x

 

x

 

x

5218

50%

40%

x

 

x

 

x

 

extremely

5136

60%

50%

x

 

 

x

x

x

 

5222

40%

30%

x

 

 

x

x

 

x

5218

50%

40%

x

 

 

x

x

 

extremely

5137

60%

50%

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

5222

30%

20%

 

x

x

x

 

 

x

5218

40%

30%

 

x

x

x

 

 

extremely

5138

50%

40%

 

x

x

 

x

x

 

5222

30%

20%

 

x

x

 

x

 

x

5218

40%

30%

 

x

x

 

x

 

extremely

5139

50%

40%

 

x

 

x

x

x

 

5222

30%

20%

 

x

 

x

x

 

x

5218

40%

30%

 

x

 

x

x

 

extremely

5140

50%

40%

 

 

x

x

x

x

 

5222

20%

20%

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

5218

30%

20%

 

 

x

x

x

 

extremely

5141

40%

30%

 

Return to Top             Return to Fingers

 

Four Fingers

Thumb

Index

Long

Ring

Little

Favorable

Unfavorable

Code

Ratings

Dominant

Non-dominant

x

x

x

x

 

x

 

5221

50%

40%

x

x

x

x

 

 

x

5217

60%

50%

x

x

x

x

 

 

extremely

5127

70%

60%

x

x

x

 

x

x

 

5221

50%

40%

x

x

x

 

x

 

x

5217

60%

50%

x

x

x

 

x

 

extremely

5128

70%

60%

x

x

 

x

x

x

 

5221

50%

40%

x

x

 

x

x

 

x

5217

60%

50%

x

x

 

x

x

 

extremely

5129

70%

60%

x

 

x

x

x

x

 

5221

50%

40%

x

 

x

x

x

 

x

5217

60%

50%

x

 

x

x

x

 

extremely

5130

70%

60%

 

x

x

x

x

x

 

5221

40%

30%

 

x

x

x

x

 

x

5217

50%

40%

 

x

x

x

x

 

extremely

5131

60%

50%

 

Return to Top             Return to Fingers

 

Five Fingers

Thumb

Index

Long

Ring

Little

Favorable

Unfavorable

Code

Ratings

Dominant

Non-dominant

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

5220

50%

40%

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

5216

60%

50%

x

x

x

x

x

 

extremely

5126

70%

60%

 

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March 18, 2002 - The Removal of the Breast

Before this date, Special Monthly Compensation was not given for the removal of the breasts under Category K.

 

That’s it. If you were separated between 2001 and today, and you did not find your condition on this page, you can Find Your Condition on our site. It will be rated exactly as it is now, so you don’t have to worry about it.

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